San Diego Scottish Highland Games Scottish Highland Games of San Diego
San Diego Scottish Highland Games & Gathering of Clans (760)726-3691 / 619-884-2940 / 619-884-3157/ 760-505-5254 PO Box 3682, Vista, CA 92084 Email: sdshgchief@sbcglobal.net
Bagpipes What could be more Scottish than bagpipes?  Just thinking about Scotland makes one think of the skirl of the pipes, and before you know it, you’re humming, “Scotland the Brave.” It has been said that "Twelve highlanders and a piper make a rebellion."  But in fact, most bagpipe lore is of a smaller scope than a full-on rebellion.  There are lots of little stories and jokes about bagpipes, of course --- many of them involving cats in a bag.  Here’s a joke that shows up in many compilations: “How’s the flat you’re living in in London, Jock?” asks his mother when he calls home to Aberdeen. “It’s okay,” he replies, “but the woman next door keeps screaming and crying all night and the guy on the other side keeps banging his head on the wall.” “Never you mind,” says his mother, “don’t you let them get to you, just ignore them.” “Aye, that I do,” he says, “I just keep playing my bagpipes.” Here’s another bagpipe story --- this one hundreds of years old. The story begins many, many years ago with a wedding of a handsome young man and his lovely bride.  The day’s festivities included feasting and dancing, the latter of which the new bride especially enjoyed.  The family and friends of the young couple were enjoying themselves with dance after dance --- to the accompaniment of the town’s best piper.  But when the clock in the church tower tolled the hour of midnight, the music stopped abruptly.  The wedding had been on a Saturday, and as the clock chimed, it was now Sunday, and the piper, well-known for being a very pious man, stopped playing and refused to begin again, despite the urging of the bride.  She offered him money and more money to continue, but the pious piper refused.  Finally, the headstrong young woman, seeing that she was not able to convince him to continue, called out, “I will have more dancing.  I will.  Nothing will stop me.  We shall dance until dawn, if the devil himself agrees to play!” Scarcely had she uttered those words when a stranger, an old man with a long beard and a set of pipes tucked under his arm, made his appearance, as though he had been waiting for just such an opportunity.  He offered his services, and soon the dancing and merrymaking resumed.  The new piper played slowly at first, but his tunes grew faster and faster and faster.  The dancers called out that they needed a break; they wanted to stop and rest a bit.  But the piper did not stop.  He played faster still, and the dancers were compelled by some unworldly force to dance faster, too, in a circle around the piper.  Finally, the first rays of dawn appeared, and the new piper stopped playing and put down the pipes.   He turned and walked away down the road, vanishing before he had gone more than ten steps.  The dancers sank down to the earth. When the villagers came that morning to see why their friends had not returned from the wedding feast, they found only a circle of stones, some standing, some lying down --- and the pious piper who had refused to play on Sunday was discovered under a nearby hedge, so haunted by what he had witnessed that he was never quite right after that. It is said that the circle of stones can still be seen at the site of the ghostly dance.
San Diego Scottish Highland Games & Gathering of Clans (760)726-3691 / 619-884-2940 / 619-884-3157/ 760-505-5254 PO Box 3682, Vista, CA 92084 Email: sdshgchief@sbcglobal.net
San Diego Scottish Highland Games Scottish Highland Games of San Diego
San Diego Scottish Highland Games & Gathering of Clans (760)726-3691 / 619-884-2940 / 619-884-3157/ 760-505-5254 Email: sdshgchief@sbcglobal.net PO Box 3682, Vista, CA 92084
Bagpipes What could be more Scottish than bagpipes?  Just thinking about Scotland makes one think of the skirl of the pipes, and before you know it, you’re humming, “Scotland the Brave.” It has been said that "Twelve highlanders and a piper make a rebellion."  But in fact, most bagpipe lore is of a smaller scope than a full-on rebellion.  There are lots of little stories and jokes about bagpipes, of course --- many of them involving cats in a bag.  Here’s a joke that shows up in many compilations: “How’s the flat you’re living in in London, Jock?” asks his mother when he calls home to Aberdeen. “It’s okay,” he replies, “but the woman next door keeps screaming and crying all night and the guy on the other side keeps banging his head on the wall.” “Never you mind,” says his mother, “don’t you let them get to you, just ignore them.” “Aye, that I do,” he says, “I just keep playing my bagpipes.” Here’s another bagpipe story --- this one hundreds of years old. The story begins many, many years ago with a wedding of a handsome young man and his lovely bride.  The day’s festivities included feasting and dancing, the latter of which the new bride especially enjoyed.  The family and friends of the young couple were enjoying themselves with dance after dance --- to the accompaniment of the town’s best piper.  But when the clock in the church tower tolled the hour of midnight, the music stopped abruptly.  The wedding had been on a Saturday, and as the clock chimed, it was now Sunday, and the piper, well-known for being a very pious man, stopped playing and refused to begin again, despite the urging of the bride.  She offered him money and more money to continue, but the pious piper refused.  Finally, the headstrong young woman, seeing that she was not able to convince him to continue, called out, “I will have more dancing.  I will.  Nothing will stop me.  We shall dance until dawn, if the devil himself agrees to play!” Scarcely had she uttered those words when a stranger, an old man with a long beard and a set of pipes tucked under his arm, made his appearance, as though he had been waiting for just such an opportunity.  He offered his services, and soon the dancing and merrymaking resumed.  The new piper played slowly at first, but his tunes grew faster and faster and faster.  The dancers called out that they needed a break; they wanted to stop and rest a bit.  But the piper did not stop.  He played faster still, and the dancers were compelled by some unworldly force to dance faster, too, in a circle around the piper.  Finally, the first rays of dawn appeared, and the new piper stopped playing and put down the pipes.   He turned and walked away down the road, vanishing before he had gone more than ten steps.  The dancers sank down to the earth. When the villagers came that morning to see why their friends had not returned from the wedding feast, they found only a circle of stones, some standing, some lying down --- and the pious piper who had refused to play on Sunday was discovered under a nearby hedge, so haunted by what he had witnessed that he was never quite right after that. It is said that the circle of stones can still be seen at the site of the ghostly dance.
San Diego Scottish Highland Games & Gathering of Clans (760)726-3691 / 619-884-2940 / 619-884-3157/ 760-505-5254 Email: sdshgchief@sbcglobal.net PO Box 3682, Vista, CA 92084