San Diego Scottish Highland Games Scottish Highland Games of San Diego
San Diego Scottish Highland Games & Gathering of Clans (760)726-3691 / 619-884-2940 / 619-884-3157/ 760-505-5254 PO Box 3682, Vista, CA 92084 Email: sdshgchief@sbcglobal.net
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Ancestry Corner by Judy Brooks, Professional Genealogist Each month this new section will give you information on how to conduct your own genealogy research. Planning a Road Trip?? As I am currently working on plans for a genealogy road trip in Ohio in April, I thought I'd give you some hints on things to consider when planning a trip to visit the areas where your ancestor lived. Why a road trip?  There are treasures to be found at local libraries, court houses, historical societies, churches, and cemeteries. Especially in those small rural areas where resources aren't available to digitize items or where those who maintain sites have not visited.  For example the old local weekly newspaper I found on microfilm in the library of Pawnee City, Nebraska.  Or the court records of Scott county Iowa at the Davenport Library.  None of which are available on line.  There's also the ambiance of being in the same area where your ancestors lived - actually seeing where their farm was (and even the old dilapidated barn that is still standing).  Or attending church services where they worshipped. Prior planning - More than air travel, hotels, and car rentals. 1. Record a time line for each ancestor I created a chart for a personal timeline that includes date, age, event and location and then documentation and notes.  This helps me identify exactly where they were living, when they married and where, when children were born, death and cemetery.  Notes include church and occupation.  I also know what documentation I already have and what I might be looking for as well as what area I'm wanting to see. (Include time to visit a cemetery or church) 2. Find what repositories are in the area Then I research the actual area and search for genealogy resources just using my search engine. Family Tree Magazine has a wonderful free Research Repository Checklist that I find extremely helpful.  www.familytreemagazine.com/freeforms (They have others of interest also) Using the checklist and their website, I record address, hours, and contacts.  (Since I am visiting 3 counties in Ohio, I had to use this information to determine when I would visit each site)   For example, one county historical society was only open 3 days out of the week. Plan the number of days needed in each area. 3. Contact the repositories I then email them to let them know I am planning a visit and let them know what family or families I am interested in researching in order to ascertain if they feel they have anything that can help in my research.  You'll find these people (who  are often volunteers and are probably addicted to genealogy as are you) very helpful and often willing to arrange to be open just for you. 4. Share your research Historical societies and libraries often have "Family Files" where they store written inquiries or family history submissions.  Consider taking a copy of your tree or documents and offer them the opportunity to make a copy for their files.  You may help and connect with others researching the same family.  5.Now reserve your travel and hotel rooms. 
San Diego Scottish Highland Games & Gathering of Clans (760)726-3691 / 619-884-2940 / 619-884-3157/ 760-505-5254 PO Box 3682, Vista, CA 92084 Email: sdshgchief@sbcglobal.net
San Diego Scottish Highland Games Scottish Highland Games of San Diego
San Diego Scottish Highland Games & Gathering of Clans (760)726-3691 / 619-884-2940 / 619-884-3157/ 760-505-5254 Email: sdshgchief@sbcglobal.net PO Box 3682, Vista, CA 92084
Join Highland Happenings!
Email:
For Email Marketing you can trust
Ancestry Corner by Judy Brooks, Professional Genealogist Each month this new section will give you information on how to conduct your own genealogy research. Planning a Road Trip?? As I am currently working on plans for a genealogy road trip in Ohio in April, I thought I'd give you some hints on things to consider when planning a trip to visit the areas where your ancestor lived. Why a road trip?  There are treasures to be found at local libraries, court houses, historical societies, churches, and cemeteries. Especially in those small rural areas where resources aren't available to digitize items or where those who maintain sites have not visited.  For example the old local weekly newspaper I found on microfilm in the library of Pawnee City, Nebraska.  Or the court records of Scott county Iowa at the Davenport Library.  None of which are available on line.  There's also the ambiance of being in the same area where your ancestors lived - actually seeing where their farm was (and even the old dilapidated barn that is still standing).  Or attending church services where they worshipped. Prior planning - More than air travel, hotels, and car rentals. 1. Record a time line for each ancestor I created a chart for a personal timeline that includes date, age, event and location and then documentation and notes.  This helps me identify exactly where they were living, when they married and where, when children were born, death and cemetery.  Notes include church and occupation.  I also know what documentation I already have and what I might be looking for as well as what area I'm wanting to see. (Include time to visit a cemetery or church) 2. Find what repositories are in the area Then I research the actual area and search for genealogy resources just using my search engine. Family Tree Magazine has a wonderful free Research Repository Checklist that I find extremely helpful.  www.familytreemagazine.com/freeforms (They have others of interest also) Using the checklist and their website, I record address, hours, and contacts.  (Since I am visiting 3 counties in Ohio, I had to use this information to determine when I would visit each site)   For example, one county historical society was only open 3 days out of the week. Plan the number of days needed in each area. 3. Contact the repositories I then email them to let them know I am planning a visit and let them know what family or families I am interested in researching in order to ascertain if they feel they have anything that can help in my research.  You'll find these people (who  are often volunteers and are probably addicted to genealogy as are you) very helpful and often willing to arrange to be open just for you. 4. Share your research Historical societies and libraries often have "Family Files" where they store written inquiries or family history submissions.  Consider taking a copy of your tree or documents and offer them the opportunity to make a copy for their files.  You may help and connect with others researching the same family.  5.Now reserve your travel and hotel rooms. 
Join our Newsletter
San Diego Scottish Highland Games & Gathering of Clans (760)726-3691 / 619-884-2940 / 619-884-3157/ 760-505-5254 Email: sdshgchief@sbcglobal.net PO Box 3682, Vista, CA 92084