San Diego Scottish Highland Games Scottish Highland Games of San Diego
San Diego Scottish Highland Games & Gathering of Clans (760)726-3691 / 619-884-2940 / 619-884-3157/ 760-505-5254 PO Box 3682, Vista, CA 92084 Email: sdshgchief@sbcglobal.net
Sea Spells and Moor Magic Feuding clans.  Clever women.  Brave warriors.  Fairies and selkies.   Ghosts.  Powerful swords and strong magic.  Scottish legends have it all.  And over the centuries, the tales and legends of Scotland have been a part of all things Scots --- any gathering, from a small group of family and friends around the fire to hundreds in a large arena or at the games. Storytelling has been featured in one way or another at the San Diego Highland Games since they began, and now I'm delighted for the opportunity to share some story-related tidbits with readers of "Highland Happenings." I'm Marilyn McPhie  -- a little bit Scots by ancestry and a lot Scots by marriage.   I'm also a professional storyteller, president of Storytellers of San Diego and a California state liaison for the National Storytelling Network. Every clan has its stories, and the McPhies have some great ones.  Historically they come from the island of Colonsay, one of the Western Isles.  The clan badge features  a demi lion rampant, proper and the motto "Pro Rege" -- "For the king."  The tartan is red, green and yellow, similar to the tartans of the McIvers and the Camerons.  The McPhies share the heritage with Duffies, Macfies, and so many more.  The name McPhie is translated as "son of the dark man of peace" or sometimes "son of the dark fairy," referring to the McPhie's association with fairy folk.   In fact, legend has it that the McPhies actually descended from selkies, seal people. When I introduce myself as a McPhie, most people get the spelling wrong.  I like to give them the benefit of the doubt by saying, "You must be thinking about John McPhee, the writer."  If they look at me blankly, I venture, "Or Katharine McPhee, the singer."  Still nothing, "Or Archie McPhee, the catalog of bacon wallets and glow-in the dark rocks."  Then, inevitably, "Nanny McPhee."  Yes, that's it.  I once had a couple of teachers ask if Marilyn McPhie was a stage name.  That made me laugh. Other well-known McPhies (in addition to the above) include famous pipers, a notorious sheep-stealer and outlaw, and (according to a friend of mine) a great Hawaiian surfer! If you visit the island of Colonsay (and you should), you will find a beautiful, green place with many sheep, beautiful beaches (who knew?), and friendly folks.  And mountains --- well, hills.  And on Colonsay, they refer to the hills as McPhies.  So every time you climb to the top of one of the hills, you can claimed to have "bagged a McPhie." I'll end with a little story that my father-in-law loved to tell.  Angus was sitting by his dying wife in a cold cottage lit only by a single precious candle.  As the night got colder, he decided to go out to get some wood for a fire to warm the room.  Before he left, he leaned over and tenderly whispered to Jenny, "I'm going out for kindling, and I'll be back shortly.  But if you should feel yourself slipping away before I get back, be sure to blow out the candle."
Sea Spells and Moor Magic
San Diego Scottish Highland Games & Gathering of Clans (760)726-3691 / 619-884-2940 / 619-884-3157/ 760-505-5254 PO Box 3682, Vista, CA 92084 Email: sdshgchief@sbcglobal.net
San Diego Scottish Highland Games Scottish Highland Games of San Diego
San Diego Scottish Highland Games & Gathering of Clans (760)726-3691 / 619-884-2940 / 619-884-3157/ 760-505-5254 Email: sdshgchief@sbcglobal.net PO Box 3682, Vista, CA 92084
Sea Spells and Moor Magic Feuding clans.  Clever women.  Brave warriors.  Fairies and selkies.   Ghosts.  Powerful swords and strong magic.  Scottish legends have it all.  And over the centuries, the tales and legends of Scotland have been a part of all things Scots --- any gathering, from a small group of family and friends around the fire to hundreds in a large arena or at the games. Storytelling has been featured in one way or another at the San Diego Highland Games since they began, and now I'm delighted for the opportunity to share some story-related tidbits with readers of "Highland Happenings." I'm Marilyn McPhie  -- a little bit Scots by ancestry and a lot Scots by marriage.   I'm also a professional storyteller, president of Storytellers of San Diego and a California state liaison for the National Storytelling Network. Every clan has its stories, and the McPhies have some great ones.  Historically they come from the island of Colonsay, one of the Western Isles.  The clan badge features  a demi lion rampant, proper and the motto "Pro Rege" -- "For the king."  The tartan is red, green and yellow, similar to the tartans of the McIvers and the Camerons.  The McPhies share the heritage with Duffies, Macfies, and so many more.  The name McPhie is translated as "son of the dark man of peace" or sometimes "son of the dark fairy," referring to the McPhie's association with fairy folk.   In fact, legend has it that the McPhies actually descended from selkies, seal people. When I introduce myself as a McPhie, most people get the spelling wrong.  I like to give them the benefit of the doubt by saying, "You must be thinking about John McPhee, the writer."  If they look at me blankly, I venture, "Or Katharine McPhee, the singer."  Still nothing, "Or Archie McPhee, the catalog of bacon wallets and glow- in the dark rocks."  Then, inevitably, "Nanny McPhee."  Yes, that's it.  I once had a couple of teachers ask if Marilyn McPhie was a stage name.  That made me laugh. Other well-known McPhies (in addition to the above) include famous pipers, a notorious sheep-stealer and outlaw, and (according to a friend of mine) a great Hawaiian surfer! If you visit the island of Colonsay (and you should), you will find a beautiful, green place with many sheep, beautiful beaches (who knew?), and friendly folks.  And mountains --- well, hills.  And on Colonsay, they refer to the hills as McPhies.  So every time you climb to the top of one of the hills, you can claimed to have "bagged a McPhie." I'll end with a little story that my father-in-law loved to tell.  Angus was sitting by his dying wife in a cold cottage lit only by a single precious candle.  As the night got colder, he decided to go out to get some wood for a fire to warm the room.  Before he left, he leaned over and tenderly whispered to Jenny, "I'm going out for kindling, and I'll be back shortly.  But if you should feel yourself slipping away before I get back, be sure to blow out the candle."
San Diego Scottish Highland Games & Gathering of Clans (760)726-3691 / 619-884-2940 / 619-884-3157/ 760-505-5254 Email: sdshgchief@sbcglobal.net PO Box 3682, Vista, CA 92084